Elwha River Delta

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For more than 100 years, the mouth of the Elwha River was a sterile chute dumping out into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Shortly after the dam removal began in 2011, a century’s worth of sediment began to flow downstream in the newly freed currents. And now, five years later, the reborn delta is a complex, thriving tideland with acres and acres of ponds, sloughs and flats–ideal rearing habitat for juvenile salmon and countless nearshore critters.

This weekend, Weston and I found ourselves in Port Angeles for a basketball tournament (his, not mine) and we stole away before Sunday’s games to visit, walk, and throw rocks into ice-covered ponds covering this new-yet-ancient landscape. As with every visit, I found myself buoyed by the rebirth of the Elwha. It’s simply one of the most uplifting places I’ve ever experienced.

I’m not sure if Weston fully appreciates the significance of what’s happened there, or if it’s lost on him, but I know it’s not just a great rearing place for juvenile fish–it’s also perfect for juvenile humans. And adults, too. Visit if you can. Walk into the lower dam site, close your eyes and imagine the canyon filled with stagnant reservoir water, then open them to see the miracle of rapids, flowing water, and gorgeous steelhead runs. Drive down to the mouth and walk the delta beach and feel the power we have to undo past mistakes. I guarantee it will lift your spirits. Next up: The Klamath, the Snake, Matilija Creek, San Francisquito…

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Salmon Superheroes

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Yvon said that if something happened to the building while this crew was in it, salmon would be doomed. I couldn’t agree more. For me it was an honor just to sit with these people–my heroes in wild salmon conservation–for an entire day, while plotting how Patagonia Provisions can best contribute to the effort. This is the Patagonia Provisions Wild Salmon Advisory Team.

In many ways it was a historical meeting of the minds; scientists, advocates, fishermen, authors and a commercial fish company (Provisions) working together to ensure a future for wild salmon. I can’t think of another salmon purveyor that’s ever spent this much money and effort to convene a group like this, or one that would act on their recommendations.

Back row: Nick Gayeski (Wild Fish Conservancy), Mark Kurlansky (author of Cod), Matt Stoecker (DamNation, Stoecker Ecological), Dr. Jack Stanford (Flathead Lake Biological Station), Jim Lichatowich (author of Salmon Without Rivers), Keith Carpenter (Lummi Island Wild), Aaron Hill (Watershed Watch), Bruce Hill (Skeena Wild), Lisa Pike-Sheehy (Patagonia).

Front Row: Birgit Cameron (Patagonia Provisions), James Farag (Patagonia Provisions), Jill Dumain (Patagonia), Misty MacDuffee (Rain Coast Conservation), Dr. Carol Ann Woody (Fisheries Research Consulting) , Me (blinded by the California sunshine and star power around me), Kurt Beardslee (Wild Fish Conservancy), Yvon Chouinard (Patagonia).

Heavyweights all. And with this group meeting annually, the future of wild salmon looks better and brighter. I felt lucky to be a part of it, and even luckier to call these people friends.


Great Damnation Update

My good friends Matt and Yvon envisioned Damnation four years ago, and I think they would agree it’s even more powerful than anyone could have imagined. From all the film-world accolades to becoming a rallying point for dam removal all over the world, it’s been a huge success. If you haven’t seen the original, I highly recommend it–inspiring, powerful and entertaining.

This short (above) updates what’s going on now as the film’s power reverberates. The inspiration continues. And as Yvon says, it’s “a reminder that activism works.”

Keep it rolling boys!